Jorrit Djikstra: Music for Reeds and Electron...

Jorrit Djikstra: Music for Reeds and Electron...

“As a saxophone player and composer who has integrated electronics in my music for many years, I wanted to experiment with the reed quintet – typically a classical chamber music format – by opening it up with improvisation and electronics… it ended up as a curious assemblage at the intersection of electronic music, noise, free jazz, and modern chamber music.”

Andrew Raffo Dewar: Interactions Quartet :: R...

Andrew Raffo Dewar: Interactions Quartet :: R...

“. . . There are moments in these pieces that explore the tension and interaction between noise and melody, acoustic and electronic sounds, the acousmatic blurring of sound sources, the subversion of the traditional conceptions of foreground and background events, notated structural materials that function invisibly within the music, and improvisations that can be difficult to determine where they lie on the spectrum of fixity and flux. . .”

Addleds: Mottle :: Weird Ear (2013)

Addleds: Mottle :: Weird Ear (2013)

Addleds explores timbral and textural extremes of distended instrumental technique via improvisation and open-ended compositional strategies. Their music tends towards a brutalist minimalism as informed by the noise underground as by recent developments in the field of free improvisation.

mchtnchts : .a….i…. :: Onyudo 22 ...

mchtnchts : .a….i…. :: Onyudo 22 ...

Lance Grabmiller and I have been partners in shudder (with Phillip Greenlief) since 2004, on double reeds and digital electronics respectively. In 2012, we began exploring a duo configuration employing exclusively modular analog electronics. The results have thus far been delightfully nasty, unapologetically invoking our mutual love of old-school industrial crunch. Our opening salvo is available as a FREE DOWNLOAD.

Baker/Bruckmann/Zerang: Psychotic Redaction :...

Baker/Bruckmann/Zerang: Psychotic Redaction :...

“. . . if I closed my eyes, I managed a vague, if largely false, memory of being present at a Smithsonian Folkways recording session in some obscure basement in Mumbai or Tunisia. A mad rumba line was twisting insect—like through the cabaret, driven in their frenzy by the rubber mallets and honking legbone flutes of the featured musicians. At one side of the room, a group of Fez-appareled recording technicians could be seen working diligently on some ancient machinery. . .”

Contact Kyle Bruckmaan

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.